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EXHIBITIONS BY YEAR

Some Contemporary Prints

21 July to 13 September 1983

View on MoMA


MoMA Staff

Organizer
Riva Castleman  American, 1930–2014

Artists

Malcolm Morley
American, born Great Britain 1931
10 exhibitions
Frank Stella
American, born 1936
50 exhibitions
Elizabeth Murray
8 exhibitions
Jasper Johns
American, born 1930
99 exhibitions
Ralph Humphrey
American, 1932–1990
3 exhibitions
Howard Hodgkin
British, born 1932
10 exhibitions
Eric Fischl
American, born 1948
4 exhibitions
Enzo Cucchi
Italian, born 1949
7 exhibitions
Francesco Clemente
Italian, born 1952
16 exhibitions
Louisa Chase
American, born 1951
4 exhibitions
Billy Al Bengston
American, born 1934
8 exhibitions
Georg Baselitz
German, born 1938
18 exhibitions
Jennifer Bartlett
American, born 1941
12 exhibitions
Peter Alexander
American, born 1939
4 exhibitions

New York Times Review of the exhibition

PUBLISHED

21 August 1983

A RARESHOW OF THE FAMILIAR MASTERS

By Michael BRENSON

LUGANO, Switzerland The most spectacular exhibition in Europe this summer is not in Paris or London or Berlin but in a villa on the eastern tip of Lugano, Switzerland. In exchange for a loan of 40 paintings from his celebrated Old Master collection, Baron Hans Heinrich Thyssen-Bornemisza has borrowed 40 late 19th- and early 20th-century French paintings of the highest quality from the Hermitage Museum in Leningrad and the Pushkin Museum in Moscow. The show is of particular interest, since the paintings have been rarely seen in the West since they were acquired by the two great Russian collectors, Ivan Morozov and Sergei Shchukin, in the years prior to World War I. This Impressionism to Cubism greatest-hits shows, installed in the private quarters of the baron's Villa Favorita, the building that houses his Old Master museum, continues through Oct. 15. The Soviet authorities' selection of the baron's top 40, which includes paintings by Rogier van der Weyden, Titian, El Greco and Goya, will be on display at the Pushkin from Sept. 12 to Nov. 14 and the Hermitage from Nov. 19 to Feb. 1, 1984.

New York Times • Arts • page 1 • 1,753 words