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EXHIBITIONS BY YEAR

Recent Acquisitions: Drawings

19 March to 2 June 1981

View on MoMA


MoMA Staff

Director
John Elderfield  British, born 1943

Artists

Ben Shahn
American, born Lithuania. 1898–1969
86 exhibitions
Rikuro Okamoto
Japanese, born 1943
1 exhibition
Jasper Johns
American, born 1930
99 exhibitions
Jörg Immendorff
German, 1945–2007
7 exhibitions
Al Held
American, 1928–2005
15 exhibitions
Richard Haas
American, born 1936
7 exhibitions
Natalia Goncharova
Russian, 1881–1962
20 exhibitions
Albert Gleizes
French, 1881–1953
16 exhibitions
William Fett
American, 1918–2006
3 exhibitions
Max Ernst
French, born Germany. 1891–1976
92 exhibitions
Arthur Dove
American, 1880–1946
33 exhibitions
Charles Demuth
American, 1883–1935
51 exhibitions
Sonia Delaunay-Terk
French, born Russia. 1885–1979
13 exhibitions
Peter De Francia
British, 1921–2012
2 exhibitions
William Baziotes
American, 1912–1963
15 exhibitions
Paul Wonner
American, 1920–2008
2 exhibitions
Tom Wesselmann
American, 1931–2004
27 exhibitions
Joyce Weinstein
American, born 1931
1 exhibition
Pavel Tchelitchew
American, born Russia. 1898–1957
59 exhibitions
Yves Tanguy
American, born France. 1900–1955
53 exhibitions
Myron Stout
American, 1908–1987
3 exhibitions
David Smith
American, 1906–1965
33 exhibitions
Everett Shinn
American, 1873–1953
1 exhibition
Colin Self
British, born 1941
8 exhibitions
Kurt Schwitters
German, 1887–1948
56 exhibitions
Oskar Schlemmer
German, 1888–1943
45 exhibitions
Arnold Rosenberg
5 exhibitions
Georges Ribemont-Dessaignes
French, 1884–1974
4 exhibitions
Robert Rauschenberg
American, 1925–2008
87 exhibitions
Lucio Pozzi
American, born 1935
3 exhibitions
Jackson Pollock
American, 1912–1956
59 exhibitions
Sigmar Polke
German, 1941–2010
14 exhibitions
Gerardo Pita
Spanish, born 1950
1 exhibition
Pablo Picasso
Spanish, 1881–1973
231 exhibitions
A.R. Penck (Ralf Winkler)
German, born 1939
20 exhibitions
Joan Miró
Spanish, 1893–1983
137 exhibitions
Roberto Matta
Chilean, 1911–2002
45 exhibitions
Henri Matisse
French, 1869–1954
182 exhibitions
Kenneth Martin
British, 1905–1984
2 exhibitions
Agnes Martin
American, born Canada. 1912–2004
24 exhibitions
Sylvia Plimack Mangold
American, born 1938
5 exhibitions
Man Ray
American, 1890–1976
78 exhibitions
Sol LeWitt
American, 1928–2007
43 exhibitions
Fernand Léger
French, 1881–1955
110 exhibitions
Lois Lane
American, born 1948
8 exhibitions
Paul Klee
German, born Switzerland. 1879–1940
132 exhibitions
Alex Katz
American, born 1927
26 exhibitions
Yvonne Jacquette
American, born 1934
9 exhibitions
Robert Delaunay
French, 1885–1941
48 exhibitions
Enzo Cucchi
Italian, born 1949
7 exhibitions
Alan Cote
American, born 1937
5 exhibitions
Joseph Cornell
American, 1903–1972
22 exhibitions
Chuck Close
11 exhibitions
Sandro Chia
Italian, born 1946
9 exhibitions
Paul Cézanne
French, 1839–1906
89 exhibitions
Carlo Carrà
Italian, 1881–1966
11 exhibitions
Elizabeth Butterworth
British, born 1949
3 exhibitions
Claudio Bravo
Chilean, 1936–2011
3 exhibitions
Stanley Boxer
American, born 1926
1 exhibition
Peter Blume
American, 1906–1992
46 exhibitions
James Biederman
American, born 1947
2 exhibitions
Frances Barth
American, born 1946
2 exhibitions
Alice Aycock
American, born 1946
5 exhibitions
Charles Arnoldi
American, born 1946
3 exhibitions
Robert Arneson
3 exhibitions

New York Times Review of the exhibition

PUBLISHED

3 April 1981

The talk of Houston

By Grace GLUECK

THE recent appointment of Barbara Rose, the art historian and critic, as curator of exhibitions and collections at the Museum of Fine Arts in Houston, has set off a little controversy in that upand-coming culture center. It's not only that Miss Rose will retain her job in New York as art editor of Vogue, touching down in Houston for one week every month. It's also that last week, a story in The Houston Post by Mimi Crossley, art critic for the paper, reported that a month before Miss Rose's hiring, the museum acquired five paintings from her husband, the songwriter Jerry Leiber, for an unconfirmed purchase price of $80,000.

New York Times • Arts • page 21 • 1,196 words