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EXHIBITIONS BY YEAR

Philip Johnson: Selected Gifts

10 April to 27 October 1985

View on MoMA


MoMA Staff

Curator
Selector
Philip Johnson  American, 1906–2005

Artists

Robert Rauschenberg
American, 1925–2008
87 exhibitions
Andy Warhol
American, 1928–1987
48 exhibitions
Bradley Walker Tomlin
American, 1899–1953
14 exhibitions
Mark di Suvero
American, born 1933
6 exhibitions
Frank Stella
American, born 1936
50 exhibitions
Richard Stankiewicz
American, 1922–1983
10 exhibitions
Richard Serra
American, born 1939
23 exhibitions
George Segal
American, 1924–2000
17 exhibitions
Mark Rothko
American, born Russia (now Latvia). 1903–1970
28 exhibitions
Claes Oldenburg
69 exhibitions
Barnett Newman
American, 1905–1970
24 exhibitions
Robert Morris
American, born 1931
36 exhibitions
Agnes Martin
American, born Canada. 1912–2004
24 exhibitions
Roy Lichtenstein
American, 1923–1997
57 exhibitions
Franz Kline
American, 1910–1962
21 exhibitions
Ellsworth Kelly
42 exhibitions
Donald Judd
American, 1928–1994
22 exhibitions
Jasper Johns
American, born 1930
99 exhibitions
Philip Guston
American, born Canada. 1913–1980
21 exhibitions
Adolph Gottlieb
American, 1903–1974
22 exhibitions

New York Times Review of the exhibition

PUBLISHED

10 May 1985

ART: A SHOW OF WORKS GIVEN BY PHILIP JOHNSON

By John RUSSELL

''PHILIP JOHNSON: Selected Gifts'' at the Museum of Modern Art is a fascinating and, on at least one count, a provocative affair. It consists of 40 paintings and sculptures by 31 artists, all given to the museum by Mr. Johnson since 1942. The roster of artists includes some - Jasper Johns, Frank Stella and Neil Jenney among them - of whom Mr. Johnson has been a longtime champion. But it also includes many to whom he is not known to have a strong private commitment - Yves Klein, for instance, and Arman, Lucas Samaras, Jim Dine, Agnes Martin, Tom Wesselmann and others. A close look at the checklist will also reveal to what an extent the donor made sure that the Modern Museum got good paintings by the Abstract Expressionists at a time when not everyone thought of them as indispensable. There was work to be done for Mark Rothko and Bradley Walker Tomlin in 1952, Philip Guston in 1956, Adolph Gottlieb in 1958 and Barnett Newman in 1959, and Philip Johnson went ahead and did it.

New York Times • Arts • page 24 • 1,423 words